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judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president for us. >> is it possible to rescind his decrees? >> we have had a dialogue. >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president and we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step to forward, not to backward. >> reporter: as you heard, we pressed them on the why reasonable degree idea of the president
cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue with our -- >> are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole we must take a step to -- forward, not to backward. >> reporter: that was one of the top advisers for mr. morsi.
and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt, when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that. because, morsi took his step hours after secretary of state clinton praised him for helping broker the deal between hamas and israel and so far, at least the administration issued, the state department, a tepid criticism. how tough should they get with them? directly say pull back, what should our demands an leverage be? >> our leverage is obviously, not only the substantial billions in aid we provide, plus, debt forgiveness and an i. -- an imf deal, but the marshalling world publish opinion is against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but it always in the past the united states that brokered the deals and there is a clear perception at least amongst hamas that they won on this one. and, un
of demonstrators, already the start of violence, and all this comes just one day after mr. morsi was praised, praised effusively by u.s. officials for his role in mediating the israel/gaza fight. back to you in new york. gregg: it just goes to show you how quickly events can turn around in that region of the world. steve heir began, we'll check back with you a bit later on. thanks very much, in cairo. patti ann: and another hotbed in that region, the hamas terror group is now accusing israel of breaking ceasefire rules two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. israeli officials say they will investigate reports that a palestinian man was killed. israel has arrested several palestinians suspected of blowing up a bus in tel aviv. we'll bring you the latest on that when we have that. gregg: those are just a few of the many stories we are following this morning. a busy day in "america's newsroom." >>> plus, a boat trip turning deadly off the coast of florida. how 23 people ended up in a fight for their lives. patti ann: and tragedy on the highway. a chain reaction crash ca
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
're determined to stay here until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. here's what one protester had to say. >> translator: i completely reject the constitutional decree that was announced last there's by the president because it gives president morsi is powers of a new pharaoh in egypt. actually, there was never a pharaoh like this before because ousted president hosni mubarak, with all his arrogance and dictatorial tendencies, never gave himself the power that no one can appeal his decisions. >> reporter: the opposing factions don't look like they're backing down, martin, neither does the muslim brotherhood and the president. that's why this looks to be an intensifying situation in the days ahead. >> reza, the president has said this decree is only temporary. what does he mean by that? >> reporter: well, this was his attempt to placate his opponents and his critics. he released the statement saying that these decrees are temporary only until a parliament is formed. and this all-important new constitution is drafted. he says this is an effort to keep the old recommend nantds of the mubarak
of the opposition faction continue to demand mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. we just spoke to one of his senior advisers a couple of hours ago. he wants dialogue with the leading opposition factions. he didn't say anything about these decrees today. there are talks scheduled with the judges. but at this hour, no talks scheduled with the opposition factions. tomorrow big protests on both sides. both the opposing factions and mr. morsi the muslim brotherhood calling for 1 million man protests. >> interesting timing, of course, as they try to negotiate some kind of a peace treaty there or at least continuing relation of talks with the peace talks reza sayah for us. >>> holiday shoppers in full force through black friday. did you go shopping, christine? >> heck no. have you read my book, soledad? don't spend money you don't have. >> 247, that's a record, 247 million? >> it is a record number but it's stretched out over four days now. now the days are thursday through sunday. let me throw in cyber monday, right, so it all comes together in huge, huge four-day frenzy of buying. >> total spending of w
with mubarak. we are going to oust him. >> now today mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood are scheduled to meet with the judges, the supreme judicial council, that's one of the groups that his decrees undermine. the problem is, there is no dialogue to get to the leaders of some of the other oppositions. >> and more than $4 billion as well and the judges are threatening to strike. so even with all of that, no decision for morsi to revoke that decree? >> well, we just spoke to one of his senior advisers, and he seemed to suggest that he might consider it, but many will say that if he backs up, it would be a politically wrong move for him. that it will be a sign of weakness. for now, there are no indications from his office that he wants to reverse the decree. >> and reza, just as we were going on air israel's defense minister ehud barak resigned. how could this affect today's talks between israel and hamas? >> it's not clear how ehud barak's resignation is going to impact these talks. but i doubt these talks are going to fall apart the decision for a cease-fire last week were made by the top offi
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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